Hackrf One Firmware Update Windows

Since I have been using software defined radio (SDR) tools on Linux platform for a long time, it was a very new thing to me when I had to use some SDR tools on Windows. Anyway, the installation of the relevant drivers went smoothly and the devices were ready to use within a short while. In this post, I'm writing down the steps I followed to get my RTL-SDR dongle and HackRF device up and running on a Windows 10 machine. Here we go.
Instructions for RTL-SDR:

HackRF One with Firmware 2017.02.1 or newer (use linux inside virtual machine to update the firmware) Installation: Make sure HackRF is using at least the minimum firmware version (see above) Windows: Windows 7+ x64 required; Install Java JRE 64bit v1.8+ Download the latest version of Spectrum Analyzer and unzip; Install HackRF as a libusb device. Install ARM firmware, 2. Power cycle hackrf, 3. Flash CPLD firmware, 4. Power cycle hackrf. Since currently there is no way to upgrade the firmware on a HackRF One from Microsoft Windows, I though these commands may be useful for others, who have a Raspberry Pi and want to update their firmware. Alpine Testing aarch64 Official hackrf-2018.01.1-r0.apk: Driver for HackRF, allowing general purpose software defined radio: Alpine Testing armhf Official hackrf-2018.01.1-r0.apk.

(1) Connected RTL-SDR dongle to the USB port and Windows automatically detected the device and installed some drivers. But, we need to manually install a special driver called ExtIO.
(2) Download the Zadig USB driver installer from here: http://zadig.akeo.ie/
No installation necessary. It can be run immediately.Hackrf one driver
(3) Run Zadig executable. With all the default settings, click 'Install Driver' to install the WinUSB driver.
Zadig tool is used to install WinUSB driver

(4) Download and install HDSDR tool. Even though we install it, do not attempt to use RTL-SDR with HDSDR software yet.
http://hdsdr.de/download/HDSDR_install.exe
(5) Download the ExtIO driver DLL for RTL-SDR from here.
http://hdsdr.de/download/ExtIO/ExtIO_RTL2832.dll
(6) Copy the ExtIO driver DLL file to the installation directory of our HDSDR software which we installed a short while ago. In my system, this directory is,
C:Program Files (x86)HDSDR
(7) Now, start HDSDR. In my system, HDSDR automatically picked the RTL-SDR dongle as the input and sound card as the output and started picking signals. That means everything is working.
Instructions for HackRF:
(1) Connect the HackRF to the USB port and windows automatically detected it and installed some drivers.
(2) Download the Zadig USB driver installer from here: http://zadig.akeo.ie/
No installation necessary. It can be run immediately.
(3) Run Zadig executable. From the options menu, select 'List All Devices'. Then from the drop-down list, select 'HackRF One'.
(4) Since I have already installed the WINUSB driver for RTL-SDR, I don't have to do anything here. It shows that the driver is the latest already. In case you don't have that option, go ahead and click 'Install Driver' to install the WinUSB driver.
(5) Download and install HDSDR tool. Even though we install it, do not attempt to use HackRF with HDSDR software yet.
http://hdsdr.de/download/HDSDR_install.exe
(6) Download the ExtIO driver DLL for HackRF from here.
https://github.com/jocover/ExtIO_HackRF/releases
(7) Copy the ExtIO driver DLL file to the installation directory of our HDSDR software which we have installed. In my system, this directory is,
C:Program Files (x86)HDSDR
(8) Now, start HDSDR. In my system, HDSDR automatically prompted asking to select which DLL to be used, either RTL-SDR or HackRF. Select the DLL file for HackRF and it starts picking signals. That means everything is working.
Windows

HackRF One is a wide band software defined radio (SDR) half-duplex transceiver created and manufactured by Great Scott Gadgets. Its creator, Michael Ossman, launched a successful KickStarter campaign in 2014 with a first run of the project called HackRF (Project Jawbone).[1] The hardware and software's open source nature has attracted hackers, amateur radio enthusiasts, and information security practitioners.

The HackRF One PCB by Great Scott Gadgets
Hackrf one firmware

Overview[edit]

The HackRF One is capable of receiving and transmitting on a frequency range of 1MHz to 6GHz with output power of 30 mW to 1 mW depending on the band.[2] The unit comes with an SMA antenna port, CLKIN/CLKOUT SMA ports and a 2.0 USB port. The HackRF One integrates with GNU Radio and SDR# projects to provide its graphical user interface.[3] The popularity of HackRF One as a security research platform has made it featured in many information security conference talks such as BlackHat, DEF CON and BSides.[4][5][6]

Academic research[edit]

Kimmo Heinäaro presented a paper at the 2015 International Conference on Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS) outlining how military tactical communications could be hacked with HackRF One and other open source tools.[7]

In 2017, researchers were able to use HackRF One in a GPS spoofing attack to feed a vehicle false signals and mapping data to deliver the occupants to a desired location.[8]

Media attention[edit]

The HackRF One has received criticism in several media reports because it can be used to intercept the key fob signals to open car doors.[9][10]

External Links[edit]

  • HackRF One on Great Scott Gadgets

References[edit]

  1. ^'Update 24: Antennas · HackRF, an open source SDR platform'. Kickstarter. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  2. ^Jones, Jon (January 2017). 'HackRF One'. QST Magazine.
  3. ^Ossmann, Michael (2018-02-17), hackrf: low cost software radio platform, retrieved 2018-02-20
  4. ^'Black Hat USA 2017'. www.blackhat.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  5. ^Adrian Crenshaw (2015-09-12), RT100 Using a HackRF One to Infiltrate the Digital Thetford Wall Patrick Perry, retrieved 2018-02-20
  6. ^'Software defined radio talks from Defcon 23 - rtl-sdr.com'. www.rtl-sdr.com. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  7. ^Military Communications and Information Systems (ICMCIS), 2015 International Conference on : date 18-19 May 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Piscataway, New Jersey. ISBN9788393484850. OCLC949403479.CS1 maint: others (link)
  8. ^HotMobile'17 : proceedings of the 18th International Workshop on Mobile Computing Systems and Applications : February 21-22, 2017, Sonoma, CA, USA. ACM SIGMOBILE, Association for Computing Machinery. New York, New York. ISBN9781450349079. OCLC981765641.CS1 maint: others (link)
  9. ^'Amazon And eBay Slammed For Selling Device That Lets Thieves Break Into Cars'. HuffPost UK. 2017-05-15. Retrieved 2018-02-20.
  10. ^Sandeman, George (2017-05-15). 'Amazon sells gadget used for breaking into cars'. The Times. ISSN0140-0460. Retrieved 2018-02-20.

Hackrf One Software Windows

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